Blog article
See all stories »

Out of office, home and away, moving up, moving on; when security goes AWOL

The financial services industry has one of the highest rates of insider data breaches, costing on average $21.25 million in the past year alone. Whether it’s an employee acting with malicious intent, or through accidental data mishandling, staff have access to sensitive information and systems that make them a constant vulnerability. And this threat only escalates when staff go on the move.

With the summer holiday season upon us, thoughts will be turning to well-deserved time off, travel and downtime. However, for many, especially in the financial industry, the notion of waiting until the summer months to sample a new life was not feasible. In the period following Covid, the industry has suffered at the hands of the Great Resignation as burnt-out employees left for new roles. As a result, research from PwC suggests that financial services leaders have had to prioritise employee retention amid the swathes of staff exiting.

This exodus is not just a threat to the workforce itself. It also results in greater threats to resilience, security and compliance. Ensuring that the doors to the organisation’s data are appropriately locked behind them is vital whenever employees are on the move. When a staff member leaves a bank or financial institution, security leaders must ensure they have not inadvertently handed over the keys to the safe as a leaving present. Revoking any and all access and privileges to company data must be a priority.

Don’t leave the door ajar

Disorganised, ill-managed and manually-processed access requirements and identity management protocols are an open invite for security breaches.

However, it is not just those leaving for good that pose a threat. Recently promoted your long-serving payroll manager to a longed-for role in financial oversight? That positive move could result in entitlement creep, where the permissions to data, apps, information and systems she enjoyed in payroll follow her to her new home.

Permission creepers are those staff who collect permissions and access rights as they go through their career, picking up credentials to systems and data as they go. Of course, to restrict the opportunities for hacking, insider threat or illegal or incompliant activity, permissions should only be granted when relevant and required for an individual’s job. However, too many companies allow permissions to creep by not taking a proactive approach to access. This can result in toxic permissions combinations, where employees are granted inappropriate access to the systems, making fraud and error far more likely.

Even a simple summer holiday can provide an open-door opportunity. We are all conscious about signaling to would-be home burglars that we are going away on holiday, and we will take steps to protect our property in our absence. The same principle applies to businesses with staff out of the office on vacation - potentially logging in from insecure locations or signaling to cybercriminals that their attention is elsewhere. 

The results of leaving the door ajar are costly. According to the IBM Cost of a Data Breach Report 2021, the average cost of a data breach in the financial sector is $5.72 million. 

Permissions creep, unrevoked access and unmanaged identity provide the perfect conditions for the insider threat to propagate. As Gaurav Deep Singh Johar, of the Information Systems Audit and Control Association explained, “While these challenges are present in any institution, insider threats pose a greater risk for banks. There is a big reputational impact, thanks in part to increasing regulatory oversight.”

Don’t let permissions security set sail into the sunset 

Financial organisations are complex landscapes, with labyrinthine corporate structures and siloes that cast a dark shadow over access and identity visibility. However, identity security technology is moving fast. Now, automated systems powered by AI and machine learning mean that permissions can be automated and access granted on a need-to-know basis, based on individuals' employment status, roles, and responsibilities.

An automated system will quickly track down and disable ex-employees' accounts and automatically halt permissions creep as employees move about the organisation. 

The same technology can now also be even more diligent than that, monitoring access requirements based on any change in the workforce, like people being out of the office. 

The evolving variety and fluctuating workforce mean that the insider threat can only be met with automated, streamlined identity security that moves as quickly as employees themselves. Without intelligent, streamlined identity governance, banks cannot ensure they are in a state of compliance, nor ensure cybersecurity in real-time. They also miss out on opportunities to improve operational efficiency and reduce the risk of fraud and error. Automation also ensures the accuracy and completeness of data sets so critical for keeping on top of compliance and delivering critical services.

As financial workforces are on the move, home and away and to pastures new, now is the time for banks to give identity security its time in the sun. Do not let shifting sands collapse the walls around you. Wherever your employees are coming from and going to, robust security and sustained compliance start with automated identity management.

 

6435

Comments: (0)

Steve Bradford

Steve Bradford

Senior Vice President EMEA

SailPoint

Member since

10 Jun

Location

London

Blog posts

1

This post is from a series of posts in the group:

Banking Strategy, Digital and Transformation

Latest thinking in respect to Banking Strategy, Digital and Transformation. Harnessing our collective wisdom to make banking better. Ambrish Parmar


See all

Now hiring